In 1871, photographer William Henry Jackson travelled with the Hayden Geological Survey to what would soon become Yellowstone. He captured many iconic images of this wild and beautiful place.

Recently, photographer Bradley Boner set out to recreate these historic photos and create a photo time capsule.

“While Boner encountered obstacles — washed away locations and crumbled rocks — he was more surprised by what remained unchanged. It was those moments that moved him the most.

‘There were points where I would find individual rocks, like a bowling ball-sized rock, that was sitting in the same place,’ said Boner. ‘Those were the times where you almost feel like you’re looking at a museum or you’re staring through a window into the past.’

Boner’s images of these same places are a visual affirmation of the success of Congress’ declaration. Yellowstone can still connect visitors to nature’s vast sweep of time.”

It’s not often that a place remains unchanged for over 100 years. It’s truly a testament to the conservation national parks engage in, and the importance of their continuation.